Courses

The Program of Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies offers a comprehensive blend of language and culture courses. Below are the courses scheduled for spring and fall 2017. For the most up-to-date listings, visit the Registrar's office through InsideND

Fall 2018

Arabic Language courses (MEAR)

MEAR 10001/60001 01

First Year Arabic I, Section 1

Prof. G. Bualuan

MWF 9:25-10:15

Also meets TR 9:30-10:20

 

MEAR 10001/60001 02

First Year Arabic I, Section 2

Prof. C. Bronson

MWF 11:30-12:20

Also meets TR 11:00-11:50

 

MEAR 10001/60001 03

First Year Arabic I, Section 3

Prof. N. El-Horr

MWF 3:30-4:20

Also meets TR 3:30-4:20

 

5 credits

This two-semester sequence of courses is a basic introduction to all aspects of the Arabic language through a comprehensive and integrated method. The focus is on language proficiency in all areas of the language including speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to aspects of Arabic culture and everyday life in the Middle East.

MEAR 10001 is offered each spring semester and MEAR 10002 is offered each fall semester.

 

MEAR 10002/60002 01

First Year Arabic II (Section 1)

tba

MWF 9:25-10:15

Also meets TR 9:30-10:20

This two-semester sequence of courses is a basic introduction to all aspects of the Arabic language through a comprehensive and integrated method. The focus is on language proficiency in all areas of the language including speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to aspects of Arabic culture and everyday life in the Middle East.

 

MEAR 10002/60002 01

First Year Arabic II (Section 1)

Prof. G. Bualuan

MWF 9:25-10:15

Also meets TR 9:30-10:20

 

MEAR 20003/60003 01

Second Year Arabic I (Section 1)

Prof. G. Bualuan

MW 10:30-11:20

Also meets TR 11:00-11:50, 4 credits

 

MEAR 20003/60003 02

Second Year Arabic I (Section 2)

TBA

MWF 11:30-12:20

Also meets R 11:00-11:50, 4 credits

 

MEAR 20004/60004 02

Second Year Arabic II

Prof. N. El-Horr

MWF 2:00-2:50

Also meets R 2:00-2:50, 4 credits

Prerequisite:  MEAR 20003/60003 or equivalent

This course is geared to consolidating skills gained in the previous three semesters while enhancing the ability to converse and conduct oneself in Arabic.  Reading skills are enhanced by exposure to more sophisticated examples of literature.  Original written expression is encouraged through the composition of short essays.

 

MEAR 30005/60005 01

Third-Year Arabic I

Prof. C. Bronson

MWF 9:25-10:15, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  MEAR 30005/60005

This third-year Arabic course emphasis on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in interactive settings. Vocabulary building will be the focus of drills; we will cover basic vocabulary in various authentic uses of the language. Special attention will also be given to media Arabic. Basic Arabic grammar should be completed by the end of the year. We will continue with Part 2 of the Kitaab sequence. Supplementary materials, mainly from Arabic media (BBC Arabic News, newspapers, magazines), will be provided. Tests, both oral and written, will cover the textbook material, in addition to the basic grammar and the cumulative vocabulary.

 

MEAR 30303/60303 01

Advanced Conversational Arabic

Prof. G. Bualuan

T 12:30-1:20, 1 credit

This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency and socio-cultural competence by focusing on the development and enhancement of intermediate skills in speaking and listening through the use of texts and multimedia materials in Modern Standard Arabic. It also takes into consideration dialectical diversity. Class time will be spent in conversation and discussions after students read chosen texts and prepare assignments on audio-visual materials outside of class.

 

MEAR 40020/60020 01

Media Arabic I

Prof. N. El-Horr

MWF 12:50-1:40, 3 credits

This course aims to help the student acquire the skills needed to read and listen to Arabic Media at the advanced level, and to communicate in Arabic on contemporary political, social, and cultural issues relating to the Middle East and North Africa. Through media material, the student will solidify and build on the Arabic skills already acquired in previous years of study, and s/he will be trained to read and listen to different forms of Arabic Media, and speak and write about a wide range of topics related to contemporary events.

 

MEAR 40028/60028 (Cross-list MI 40668/60668)

Intro to Classical/Quranic Arabic II

Prof. L. Guo

TR 12:30-1:45, 3 credits

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of the Classical/Qur’anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur’an, Qur’anic exegeses, hadith (Prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online).  No prerequisite.

 

Middle Eastern Courses (MELC)

MELC 13186 01

Literature University Seminar: The Arabian Nights and World Literature

Prof. Li Guo

TR 3:30-4:45, 3 credit

This course has as its focal point the famous collection of tales, the Thousand and One Nights (better known as The Arabian Nights).  We examine issues of provenance.  We study the stories as literary texts as well as historical documents.  We examine how these tales have been interpreted by later societies.  Finally, we use this course to introduce us to the study of the Middle East, its languages, history, literature, and peoples.

 

MELC 30023 (Cross-list GSC 30596)

Gendered Bodies in the Islamic Tradition

Prof. C. Bronson

TR 12:30-1:45, 3 credits

This interdisciplinary course offers a topical survey of the relationships between biological sex, culturally bound notions of "masculinity" and "femininity," and the gendered body in the Islamic tradition. The primary aim of the course is to explore the intersection of religion and social constructions of gender and the body in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Muslim World. Students read and interpret religious texts and commentaries, literary and legal texts, women's writings, and media in English translation. Coursework focuses on increasing students' understanding of the diversity of scholarly views on women's bodies as sites of piety and sites of political and social contestation (reproductive rights, public vs. private space, etc.). 

 

MELC 30052 01

Sunni and Shi'i Muslims: Common Legacy, Multiple Narratives

Prof. H. Abdulsater

TR 11:00-12:15, 3 credit hours
News coverage of Middle East developments is replete with references to Shiʿi and Sunni Muslims. Their differences are often presented as a millenarian conflict, and as the cause of the discord that ravages the region. This course examines the formation of the different versions of Shiʿi and Sunni Islam. While studying the common Islamic legacy shared by both, we will look into the multiple narratives that are based on this legacy. As such, the course investigates the political developments, intellectual currents, legal positions and ritual practices that provided Shiʿi and Sunni Muslims with their rich variations on the story of Islam. Students are expected to actively participate in discussions based on te assigned weekly readings and material presented in class lectures. It is strongly recommended that students have prior knowledge of Arabic culture, the Middle East, or Islam.

 

MELC 40703 01

Modern Arab Thought

Prof. Hussein Abdulsater

TR 3:30-4:45, 3 credit hours

This course studies a group of texts that cover developments in Arab thought starting with Napoleon's Egyptian campaign of 1798 and ending with the late twentieth century. It centers on analyzing the positions of Arab intellectuals on the interaction between Arab and Western culture (looking into their positions within their respective contexts, concerns and challenges). The aim of the course is to equip students with a good understanding of the main trends in Arab culture in the last two centuries and encourage a critical examination of the problems that defined public discussion during this period. Because these questions are still very influential in contemporary debates, our knowledge of their origins and developments is essential for understanding current events and studying present Arab societies.

 

 

Spring 2018

Arabic Language courses (MEAR)

First Year Arabic I and II 

This two-semester sequence of courses is a basic introduction to all aspects of the Arabic language through a comprehensive and integrated method. The focus is on language proficiency in all areas of the language including speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to aspects of Arabic culture and everyday life in the Middle East.

MEAR 10001/60001 01

First Year Arabic I (Section 1)
Prof. N. El Horr
MWF 3:30-4:20 also meets TR 3:30-4:20, 5 credits

MEAR 10002/60002 01
Prof. G. Bualuan
MWF 9:25-10:15 also meets TR 9:30-10:20, 5 credits

MEAR 10002/60002 02
Prof. C. Bronson
MWF 11:30-12:30 also meets TR 11:00-11:50, 5 credits

Second Year Arabic I and II 

This second-year Arabic course builds on the previous three semesters. The emphasis is on speaking and writing for self-expression with continued study of the basic grammatical structures. Proficiency remains the focus through readings and conversations in the language. Students develop skill in the use of the Arabic dictionary.

MEAR 20004/60004 01
Second Year Arabic II
Prof. N. El Horr

MW 10:30 - 11:20 and TR 11:00 - 11:50, 4 credits
Prerequisite:  MEAR 20003/60003 or equivalent

Third Year Arabic I and II

This third-year Arabic course emphasis is on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in interactive settings. Vocabulary building will be the focus of drills; we will cover basic vocabulary in various authentic uses of the language. Special attention will also be given to media Arabic. Basic Arabic grammar should be completed by the end of the year. We will continue with Part 2 of the Kitaab sequence. Supplementary materials, mainly from Arabic media (BBC Arabic News, newspapers, magazines), will be provided. Tests, both oral and written, will cover the textbook material, in addition to the basic grammar and the cumulative vocabulary.

MEAR 30005/60005
Third-Year Arabic I
Prof. C. Bronson

MWF 9:25 - 10:15, 3 credits
Prerequisite:  MEAR 20004/60004

MEAR 30006/60006
Third-Year Arabic II
Prof. C. Bronson
MWF 12:50-1:40

MEAR 40040 
Arabic Folk Literature
Prof. G. Bualuan
TR 11:00-12:15

MEAR 40027
Introduction to Classical/Qur’anic Arabic I
Prof. L. Guo

TR 12:30-1:45
No prerequisites

The goal of this course is to continue to develop a basic knowledge of Classical/Qur'anic Arabic, with an emphasis on an overview of grammar and syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and serial readings of Islamic texts. We will read selections from Qur'an, Qur'anic exegeses, hadith (prophetic tradition), and other related material, such as Islamic legal texts. We will learn how to use Arabic/Islamic bibliographical references (in print and online).

Middle Eastern Courses (MELC)

MELC 10101 Intro to Arabic Culture/Civilization
Prof. H. Abdulsater
MW 12:30-1:45
 

MELC 30071 Islamic Theology
Prof. H. Abdulsater
MW 9:30-10:45